Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination PDF º Ghazali


    EPUB is an ebook file format and postmodern context Moosa employs the theme of the threshold, or dihliz, the space from which and the Poetics PDF Í Ghaz l himself engaged the different currents of thought in his day, and proposes that contemporary Muslims who wish to place their own traditions in conversation with modern traditions consider the same vantage point Moosa argues that by incorporating elements of Islamic theology, neoplatonic mysticism, and Aristotelian philosophy, Ghaz l s work epitomizes the idea that the answers to life s complex realities do not reside in a single culture or intellectual tradition Ghaz l s emphasis on poiesis creativity, imagination, and freedom of thought provides a sorely needed model for a cosmopolitan intellectual renewal among Muslims, Moosa argues Such a creative and critical inheritance, he concludes, ought to be heeded by those who seek to cultivate Muslim intellectual traditions in today s tumultuous world."/>
  • Paperback
  • 368 pages
  • Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination
  • Ebrahim Moosa
  • English
  • 10 April 2017
  • 0807856126

10 thoughts on “Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination

  1. says:

    an observation that stems from my reading of classical Islamic texts, whether they be law, theology, history, mysticism, or philosophy When studying the ancients, I am struck the epistemic openness and the liberty with which many thinkers and authors energetically engaged with a wide variety of knowledge traditions They did so without allowing the provenance of knowledge be a decisive veto factor Hence, a good portion of early Muslim intellectuals were open to the spirit of knowledge, whe an observation that stems from my reading of classical Islamic texts, whether they be law, theology, history, mysticism, or philosophy When studying the ancients, I am struck the epistemic openness and the liberty with which many thinkers and authors energetically engaged with a wide variety of knowledge traditions They did so without allowing the provenance of knowledge be a decisive veto factor Hence, a good portion of early Muslim intellectuals were open to the spirit of knowledge, whether it came from Greek, Indian, Biblical, or other philosophical traditions Some strains of thought did resist this intellectual orientation, but they were hardly successful in dampening it.This picture contrasts radically with many strains of contemporary Muslim intellectual thought, especially religious discourse The provenance of an idea or a practice issignificant in contemporary thought than the substance of the idea The prevalence of this condition has not only resulted in the atrophy of knowledge, but the process of knowledge production itself has suffocated Knowledge related to religious discourse, such as ethics, law, theology, and philosophy, is quarantined from intercourse with ideas that have a non Islamic genealogy Only in the realm of science and technology is knowledge of a non Islamic provenance tolerated, since these are viewed as secular discourses This symptomatic response, of course, is partly explicable in the light of the harsh aftermath of colonialism and the consequent loss of self confidence among Muslim societies pg 25 26 This attempt to foster a conversation among iterations of different intellectual traditions aims to advance an emancipator and humane discursive tradition, one to which the Muslim intellectual legacy can make a meaningful contribution despite the double marginalization that Muslim thought suffers Western humanities and modern philosophical traditions intentionally overlook Muslim thought as a sustainable inspiration for knowledge this is one form of marginalization And certain contemporary Muslim knowledge practices often consciously refrain from articulating Muslim thought in an accessible idiom or engaging with the historical Muslim tradition in an empowering manner from their multiple locations in the present This is a form of surrender to the hegemonic discursivity of modernity, even though Islamist proponents would claim to resist modernity by means of such actions For, indeed, those who chose isolation and absence unconsciously endorse the dominant knowledge practices as normative while reducing the knowledge of their own tradition to a subaltern status, veiled in its alleged purity and suffocating in its isolation pg 35


  2. says:

    Moosa seemed to me to be pretentious and showy at first dry and terse, but as I kept reading I am grateful we have thinkers such as him He doesn t hesitate to use new terminology or coin his own terms and ideas, which is refreshing and direly needed in Muslim discourse His insights and message can be drowned out by using the language of western social theory ethics, instead of adab tasawwuf or subjectivity instead of nafs or ruh, conscience instead of sirr But he draws from a lot of source Moosa seemed to me to be pretentious and showy at first dry and terse, but as I kept reading I am grateful we have thinkers such as him He doesn t hesitate to use new terminology or coin his own terms and ideas, which is refreshing and direly needed in Muslim discourse His insights and message can be drowned out by using the language of western social theory ethics, instead of adab tasawwuf or subjectivity instead of nafs or ruh, conscience instead of sirr But he draws from a lot of sources massive bibliography of books I want to follow up on and its good to see some real analysis of Ghazali s thought through combining Islamo centric and Euro centric viewopints I found it challenging but I grew into it I still can t grasp poeisis to clearly though Some interesting concepts so dihliz, bricolage, heteroglossia, hikaya islamic style narrative When he gets to the discuss of ta bir oneiromancy or dream interpretation in Islam you begin to finally get a grasp on dissecting Ghazali s imagination This was my initially very favorite part of the book This book is good if only for that to get an idea of the Muslim imagination and creatively employing it for the purposes of piety But then again, one can pick up that style too just from reading GhazaliI really liked his chapter on imagination, heart writing and the role of learning and and writing on Ghazali s development Very important to read for any Muslim trying to find his way through the Word Moosa dedicates 1 3 chapters on Ghazali s bouts with the philosophers and his opponents Ibn Rushd, al Ma ari, and Ibn Taymiyyah etc but these criticisms aren t denouncements, but in my view, provide greater elaboration to the Islamic tradition and a strong sign of the tradition being alive Ghazali was not for this or that, he was if anything for ihsan or arete as the Greeks say excellence he criticized taqlid, kalam scholars and the jurist theatrics of his day I admit I skipped the chapter that went into his relation with Mutazili an Asharism wayyy too boring if you ask me and so overdone The chapter on liminality and exile is important not very often, you hear Muslims talking about exile and talking of searching for one s soul The last chapter Technologies of the Self is by far, my favorite b c he expounds the fiqh an nafs, the importance of tasawwuf, and tazkiya and recommends the reader to take his development into his own hands, rather than blindly follow others Learning the movements of your own heart, and constantly finding new ways to refine your soul, is the life mission and fruit of a Muslim I ll try and put up a few great quotes from this awesome read


  3. says:

    So overall I was impressed by both the scope and the content of the book Moosa attempts to present Ghazali a seminal Islamic intellectual and religious figure , as template for the encounter of contemporary Muslims with modern knowledge and the profound social changes which have occasioned this new knowledge At times the text is dense, and Moosa sometimes gets carried away But his basic thesis is that Ghazali became a seminal figure in the Islamic intellectual tradition because he was able t So overall I was impressed by both the scope and the content of the book Moosa attempts to present Ghazali a seminal Islamic intellectual and religious figure , as template for the encounter of contemporary Muslims with modern knowledge and the profound social changes which have occasioned this new knowledge At times the text is dense, and Moosa sometimes gets carried away But his basic thesis is that Ghazali became a seminal figure in the Islamic intellectual tradition because he was able to think on the threshold dihliz between multiple disciplines and modes of thought, which allowed him to synthesise these disciplines producing something new a bricoleour he says whilst also leaving his ideas open to dialogical development I think this book is probably best for people studying the Islamic sciences but general readers might find plenty of ideas here that might be of value


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Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination[PDF / EPUB] Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination Abu Hamid al Ghaz l , a Muslim jurist theologian and polymath who lived from the mid eleventh to the early twelfth century in present day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judai Abu Hamid the Poetics ePUB ↠ al Ghaz l , a Muslim jurist theologian and polymath who lived from the mid eleventh to the early twelfth century in present day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judaism and Thomas Aquinas in Christianity He is best known for his work in philosophy, ethics, law, and mysticism Ghazali and PDF or In an engaged re reading of the ideas of this preeminent Muslim thinker, Ebrahim Moosa argues that Ghaz l s work has lasting relevance today as a model for a critical encounter with the Muslim intellectual tradition in a modern and postmodern context Moosa employs the theme of the threshold, or dihliz, the space from which and the Poetics PDF Í Ghaz l himself engaged the different currents of thought in his day, and proposes that contemporary Muslims who wish to place their own traditions in conversation with modern traditions consider the same vantage point Moosa argues that by incorporating elements of Islamic theology, neoplatonic mysticism, and Aristotelian philosophy, Ghaz l s work epitomizes the idea that the answers to life s complex realities do not reside in a single culture or intellectual tradition Ghaz l s emphasis on poiesis creativity, imagination, and freedom of thought provides a sorely needed model for a cosmopolitan intellectual renewal among Muslims, Moosa argues Such a creative and critical inheritance, he concludes, ought to be heeded by those who seek to cultivate Muslim intellectual traditions in today s tumultuous world.


About the Author: Ebrahim Moosa

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