Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre eBook ☆ Glencoe:


    Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre eBook ☆ Glencoe: the destruction of the HighlandersJohn Prebble s masterly description of the terrible events at Glencoe was praised as Evocative and powerful in the Sunday Telegraph."/>
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre
  • John Prebble
  • English
  • 12 May 2019
  • 0140028978

10 thoughts on “Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre

  1. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Every behaviour has it s impact so imagine this as I placed my half finished coffee cup down on the table, Prebble, who was my elevensies companion 1 Described Big Bang through to Sweden now2 Stood up and recited all the North land sagas learnt by rote Snorri would have snored 3 Described local superstitions4 Listed the families, from first habitation to now, who had lived on this particular piece of land5 Described the timber industry from origin to modern day that produced my ki Every behaviour has it s impact so imagine this as I placed my half finished coffee cup down on the table, Prebble, who was my elevensies companion 1 Described Big Bang through to Sweden now2 Stood up and recited all the North land sagas learnt by rote Snorri would have snored 3 Described local superstitions4 Listed the families, from first habitation to now, who had lived on this particular piece of land5 Described the timber industry from origin to modern day that produced my kitchen table.6 Described the ceramic industry from origin to modern day that produced my coffee cup7 Described the coffee industry from origin to modern day that produced my drink, with a special information spur on Colombia8 Pointed out the mini environment that was now playing influences on my kitchen light and shade, draught, temperature It is to this degree I now know the Glencoe Massacre story and have ordered Culloden on the back of it image errorLet it be secret and sudden From the foreword by John Prebble October 1965By 1690 the Highlanders were already regarded by many Lowlanders as an obstacle to the complete union of England and Scotland, and their obstinate independence of spirit expressed in their customs, their clothes and their language had to be broken and humbled.Thus the stage was set for the Campbells, working towards a union, to break the MacDonalds of Glencoe within the sense of Mi run mor nan Gall Lowlander s great hatred SING ALONG John McDermott Massacre Of Glencoe chorus O cruel is the snowThat sweeps glencoeAnd covers the grave o donaldAnd cruel was the foeThat raped glencoeAnd murderd the house ofMacdonaldThey came in a blizzardWe offered them heatA roof o er their headsDry shoes for their feetWe wined them and dined themThey ate of our meatAnd they slept in the house ofMacdonald chorus They came from fort williamWi murder in mindThe campbells had ordersKing william had signedPut all to the swordThese words were underlinedAnd leave none alive calledMacdonald chorus They came in the nightWhen the men were asleepThis band o argylesThrough snow soft and deepLike murdering foxesAmong helpless sheepThey slaughtered the house ofMacdonald chorus Some died in their bedsAt the hand of the foeSome fled in the nightAnd were lost in the snowSome lived to accuse himThat struck the first blowBut gone was the house ofMacdonald Short documentary on the massacre


  2. says:

    What an exceptional work The initial chapters are dripping with clan mythology and a very very rare glimpse of everyday life in the clan hierarchy from the Chief to the common highlander The narrative is highly readable, though scholars may sniff at the pop history approach What I most love about this book is the fact it moves beyond the normal dates and names approach to Scottish clan history and focuses on the culture the role of the Chief, bard, and piper, the Tacksman, and the common cl What an exceptional work The initial chapters are dripping with clan mythology and a very very rare glimpse of everyday life in the clan hierarchy from the Chief to the common highlander The narrative is highly readable, though scholars may sniff at the pop history approach What I most love about this book is the fact it moves beyond the normal dates and names approach to Scottish clan history and focuses on the culture the role of the Chief, bard, and piper, the Tacksman, and the common clansman Add to that the Gaelic history and mythology and this is a hard one to put down


  3. says:

    Prebble s Glencoe, already half a century old and rarely out of print, is narrative history at its best It tells the story of a late seventeenth century war crime and it carefully apportions blame on the evidence and without prejudice not easy sometimes in writings on Scottish history.This is at least one crime that is not down to the English Ultimately the coldly detached Dutchman William II gave the order for the murder of over 30 men, women and children in Glencoe in February 1692 but, as Prebble s Glencoe, already half a century old and rarely out of print, is narrative history at its best It tells the story of a late seventeenth century war crime and it carefully apportions blame on the evidence and without prejudice not easy sometimes in writings on Scottish history.This is at least one crime that is not down to the English Ultimately the coldly detached Dutchman William II gave the order for the murder of over 30 men, women and children in Glencoe in February 1692 but, as always, things are a littlecomplicated than they might at first appear.For William II the Scottish Highlandslike the American West in the age of the Frontier than anything we would recognise as orderly or perhaps like the Balkans at any time was a sideshow in a sideshow, for even England was a sideshow to his struggles with Louis XIV.This massacre was fundamentally a Scot on Scot crime, part originating in ancient clan feuds, part in Lowlander negativity towards Highlanders but mostly arising from the ambitions of a politically astute Scots politician, the Master of Stair Sir John Dalrymple, First Earl of Stair.Stair was William s Chief Minister in Scotland His ideological drive was towards something that is still a matter of political interest today the Parliamentary Union of the Two Kingdoms This was to happen in 1707 and, although he died during the process, it was to be his legacy.The victims of the massacre were not wholly innocent at least not the men folk since how a murdered child of four could be otherwise is a fact They were bandits, in effect operating much like the reivers of the previous century at the border of the pre Union Kingdoms.But, for all the undoubted brutalities of the age, the intentional murder of an entire community the orders were for muchextensive killings was always outside the moral compass of seventeenth century Scotland let alone England The book is interesting not only for the conditions that led to the crime and the apportionment of blame but also for the political shenanigans involved in inquiring as to who gave the order and why there are lessons in this for today.Political considerations had the Scottish Parliament, with a public horrified at reports of the atrocity, undertaking its own inquiry in a final pre 1707 burst of energy But the King must be protected against Jacobite critics and so he was Stair scarcely suffered at all Quite the contrary.The game was to pin it on a chain of command below those who planned the murder and protect a brilliantly slippery and cynical King from blame It was easy to deal with the only obeying orders defence and go for the military perpetrators and save the politicians Plus ca change There are few truly decent characters in this story even amongst the leading victims but one comes out of it rather well, as do two officers who broke their swords rather than become murderers and the soldiers who connived at the escape of their would be victims.This was the old Commonwealth era Puritan Governor of Inverlochy the garrison that sent the trrops into Glencoe , Sir John Hill, who did obey a key order that enabled the massacre but who tried every possible means to avoid it and who showed consummate honesty in the inquiry.He was stuck in the dilemma of all soldiers what to do when an order is clear From a humanitarian position he perhaps failed to make the right decision but it is unclear what alternatives he had He was totally out manouevred by the political will and connivance of others.A salutary tale told by a fine writer we forgive occasional lapses into local colour that might or might not be justified by the evidence who was also a fine historian Perhaps the only criticism is that the Scots of that era, caught between a Gaelic and a Lowland culture, seem to have had several names depending on circumstances family, title or nickname and Prebble is sometimes not good at being clear which one he is using at any one time.It all works out in the end What he does do well is get across that this was a frontier society, a marginal zone to Edinburgh let alone London, fought over for influence by political forces with no intrinsic interest in the natives.As for the natives, these come across as somewhat barbaric but led by the sort of cynical opportunists with titles who would later clear these poor loyal and sentimental saps from the land in the Highland Clearances for profit As a snapshot of Scottish history, an easy conclusion to draw is that Scottish nationalism is a bit of a side issue here Scotland was divided in 1692 and it is divided today The problem was one of different levels of social development and an ancien regime with its eyes on Paris and London.Simply making Scotland independent would make no difference to its people if its elites were beholden to Paris in the 1690s or to Brussels in the 2010s London looks problematic not because of its alleged oppression though this will change in the 1740s but because of its utter indifference.Well researched history and readable once the scene is set with some dense material on the complicated familial and clan relationships of the Highlands , Prebble also provide plenty of material to suggest he has done his research Recommended


  4. says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Saturday Drama In 1692 soldiers billeted in the homes of the MacDonald clan in Glencoe rose up and killed their hosts Was this Highland massacre the inevitable outcome of a long standing clan feud Or were there other factors behind this infamous betrayal Adrian Bean s play based on the contemporary parliamentary Commission Of Enquiry into the massacre and on historian John Prebble s seminal book, Glencoe dramatizes these tragic 17th century events.


  5. says:

    I first read this 30 years ago along with Preebles other books on Scotland and came back to it recently his writing stands the test of time but as history, it is very dated Perhaps the most interesting question about Glencoe ie why it remains so well known despite what is often suggested, it was not particularly unusual Other examples just involving MacDonalds include the 1578 Battle of the Spoiling Dyke or the 1647 Dunaverty Massacre Breach of hospitality was less common, but the very exis I first read this 30 years ago along with Preebles other books on Scotland and came back to it recently his writing stands the test of time but as history, it is very dated Perhaps the most interesting question about Glencoe ie why it remains so well known despite what is often suggested, it was not particularly unusual Other examples just involving MacDonalds include the 1578 Battle of the Spoiling Dyke or the 1647 Dunaverty Massacre Breach of hospitality was less common, but the very existence of the charge of Slaughter under trust shows not unknown This 1587 law was first used in 1588 to prosecute Lachlan Maclean, whose objections to his new stepfather John MacDonald led him to murder 18 members of the MacDonald wedding party in their sleep The Dunaverty killings would also have been in this category since they allegedly took place after the garrison of 200 surrendered on terms My point is that the truth is farcomplex and interesting John Preeble is worth reading and Scottish history owes him a huge debt His work was rejected by Scottish academics at the time because it focused on the abuse of the Scottish working class by their Scottish not English rulers Hard to imagine now but the standard text on the Highland economy written in the early 60s by a Scot didn t even mention the Clearances While radical in its day, he himself would have welcomed the resurgence in the study of Scottish history that means his work is out of date So read it as a starting point


  6. says:

    John Prebble s mastery of Scottish history was unquestionable, his passion ability to bring it to life was unbeatable Like all of his history books, he not only allows you to view the scenes first hand, he puts you right in the middle of the action Fully recommended to any who wish to understand the truth of the Glencoe massacre He kindly sent me a signed copy of this book, which I ll never part with John Prebble s mastery of Scottish history was unquestionable, his passion ability to bring it to life was unbeatable Like all of his history books, he not only allows you to view the scenes first hand, he puts you right in the middle of the action Fully recommended to any who wish to understand the truth of the Glencoe massacre He kindly sent me a signed copy of this book, which I ll never part with


  7. says:

    A well researched history of a shameful episode in British history The book examines in detail the tribalism inherent in the Scottish Highlands in the centuries, the events leading up to the Massacre in 1692 its subsequent influence on Scottish history on the events in the 28th century I did, however, become a little confused as to about whom the author was writing about as many of the Highlanders seemed to be referred to by different names Sometime the Clan name, other times the area or A well researched history of a shameful episode in British history The book examines in detail the tribalism inherent in the Scottish Highlands in the centuries, the events leading up to the Massacre in 1692 its subsequent influence on Scottish history on the events in the 28th century I did, however, become a little confused as to about whom the author was writing about as many of the Highlanders seemed to be referred to by different names Sometime the Clan name, other times the area or settlement name or an honorary name Maybe this was differentiate between many Highlanders having the same name All in all an interesting history of a tragic event in the History of Great Britain that should not be forgotten


  8. says:

    An excellent account of a true tragedy Prebble provides a detailed context, outlining the history preceding the event and describing the main characters He also provides a rich picture of the landscape and the challenges of clan life The massacre and its aftermath are well explained I note that Prebble has written a few additional accounts of Scottish history, and no wonder He writes as a master historian.


  9. says:

    An historical account of the massacre at Glencoe when the Campbells slaughtered their hosts the MacDonalds showing that it was carried out on government orders, not merely part of a feud The Highland MacDonalds were seen as obstacles to the political union of England and Scotland and had to be destroyed.


  10. says:

    I have had this book for over ten years and finally decided to read it I am so glad I did, it is a gripping read, real nail biting stuff I could hardly put it down.It is the story of the massacre of the MacDonald by the Campbell s and various soldiers of the crown It is all here treachery, intrigue, treason, honour, poetry and blood thirsty fights Brilliantly written and told, this is history at its best, and I can t wait to read the other two books in the series.Forget the awful nonsense of I have had this book for over ten years and finally decided to read it I am so glad I did, it is a gripping read, real nail biting stuff I could hardly put it down.It is the story of the massacre of the MacDonald by the Campbell s and various soldiers of the crown It is all here treachery, intrigue, treason, honour, poetry and blood thirsty fights Brilliantly written and told, this is history at its best, and I can t wait to read the other two books in the series.Forget the awful nonsense of Braveheart, and Game of Thrones great though that is , this is the real thing


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Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre[PDF / EPUB] Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre You are hereby ordered to fall upon the rebels, the MacDonalds of Glencoe, and to put all to the sword under seventy This was the treacherous and cold blooded order ruthlessly carried out on February You are hereby Story of PDF ↠ ordered to fall upon the rebels, the MacDonalds of Glencoe, and to put all to the sword Glencoe: The eBook Í under seventy This was the treacherous and cold blooded order ruthlessly carried out onFebruary , when the Campbells slaughtered their hosts The Story of PDF/EPUB Ä the MacDonalds at the Massacre of Glencoe It was a bloody incident which had deep repercussions and was the beginning of the destruction of the HighlandersJohn Prebble s masterly description of the terrible events at Glencoe was praised as Evocative and powerful in the Sunday Telegraph.


About the Author: John Prebble

John Edward Curtis Story of PDF ↠ Prebble, FRSL, OBE was an English Canadian journalist, novelist, documentarian and historian He is best known for Glencoe: The eBook Í his studies of Scottish historyHe was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, England, but he grew up in Saskatchewan, Canada, where his father The Story of PDF/EPUB Ä had a brother His parents emigrated there after World War I Returning to England with his family, he attended the Latymer School He joined the Communist Party of Great Britain but abandoned it after World War II.