What is Hinduism? Epub ä What is PDF/EPUB ²


What is Hinduism? [PDF / EPUB] What is Hinduism? What is HinduismIf were asked to define the Hindu creed I should simply say Search after Truth through non violent means A man may not believe even in God and still call himself a Hindu Hinduism is a What is HinduismIf were asked to define the Hindu creed I should simply say Search after Truth through non violent means A man may not believe even in God and still call himself a What is PDF/EPUB ² Hindu Hinduism is a relentless pursuit after Truth and if today it has become moribund inactive irresponsive to growth it is because we are fatigued and as soon as the fatigue is over Hinduism will burst forth upon the world with a brilliance perhaps unknown before Hinduism is the most tolerant of all religions Its creed is all embracing.

  • Paperback
  • 119 pages
  • What is Hinduism?
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • English
  • 19 April 2015
  • 9788123709277

About the Author: Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi commonly known as Mahatma Gandhi was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British ruled India Employing non violent civil disobedience Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for non What is PDF/EPUB ² violence civil rights and freedom across the worldThe son of a senior government official Gandhi was born and raised in a Hindu Bania community in coastal Gu.



10 thoughts on “What is Hinduism?

  1. says:

    Before Hinduism Met Nationalism Hinduism is a growth of ages The very name Hinduism was given to the religion of the people of Hindustan by foreigners Much of the modern sectarian notions of Hinduism has arisen since those days of what is dubbed as the “Divide Rule” policy etc that widened the rifts Gandhi’s elouent words might sound comical today in light of events that have transpired since in the name of religion but we can still read them to think of the potential that was “Hinduism is not a religion but a way of Life The beauty of Hinduism lies in its all embracing inclusiveness Hinduism tells every one to worship God according to his own faith or dharma and so it lives in peace with all the religions Its freedom from dogma makes a forcible appeal to me inasmuch as it gives the votary the largest scope for self expression Non violence is common to all religions but it has found the highest expression and application in Hinduism”This short book is a collection of Gandhiji’s letters speeches and articles; articles included in this selection are drawn mainly from Gandhiji's contributions to Young India the Harijan and the Navajivan Even though these contributions were written on different occasions they present a useful glimpse of his rich understanding of Hindu DharmaA Few Representative Excerpts It is the good fortune or the misfortune of Hinduism that it has no official creed In order therefore to protect myself against any misunderstanding I have said Truth and Non violence is my creed  A man may not believe even in God and still he may call himself a Hindu Believing as I do in the influence of heredity being born in a Hindu family I have remained a Hindu I should reject it if I found it inconsistent with my moral sense or my spiritual growth On examination I have found it to be the most tolerant of all religions known to me Its freedom from dogma makes a forcible appeal to me inasmuch as it gives the votary the largest scope for self expression Not being an exclusive religion it enables the followers of that faith not merely to respect all the other religions but it also enables them to admire and assimilate whatever may be good in the other faiths  I do not regard Jainism or Buddhism as separate from Hinduism The reader will note that I have purposely refrained from using the word divine origin in reference to the Vedas or any other scriptures For I do not believe in the exclusive divinity of the Vedas I believe the Bible the uran and the Zend Avesta to be as much divinely inspired as the Vedas My belief in the Hindu scriptures does not reuire me to accept every word and every verse as divinely inspired Nor do I claim to have any first hand knowledge of these wonderful books I do most emphatically repudiate the claim if they advance any such of the present Shankaracharyas and smritis to give a correct interpretation of the Hindu scriptures On the contrary I believe that our present knowledge of these books is in a most chaotic state I know the vice that is going on today in all the great Hindu shrines but I love them in spite of their unspeakable failings There is an interest which I take in them and which I take in no other I am a reformer through and through But my zeal never takes me to the rejection of any of the essential things of Hinduism I am not a literalist Therefore I try to understand the spirit of the various scriptures of the world I apply the test of Truth and Ahimsa laid down by these very scriptures for interpretation I reject what is inconsistent with that test and I appropriate all that is consistent with it The story of a shudra having been punished by Ramachandra for daring to learn the Vedas I reject as an interpolation And in any event I worship Rama the perfect being of my conception not a historical person facts about whose life may vary with the progress of new historical discoveries and researches Tulsidas had nothing to do with the Rama of history Judged by historical test his Ramayana would be fit for the scrap heap As a spiritual experience his book is almost unrivaled at least for me And then too I do not swear but every word that is to be found in so many editions published as the Ramayana of Tulsidas It is the spirit running through the book that holds me spellbound The Arya Samaj has I think copied the Christians in planning its propaganda The modern method does not appeal to me It has done harm than good Though regarded as a matter of the heart purely and one between the Maker and one self it has degenerated into an appeal to the selfish instinct The Arya Samaj preacher is never so happy as when he is reviling other religions The stories told in the Puranas are some of them most dangerous if we do not know their bearing on the present conditions The shastras would be death traps if we were to regulate our conduct according to every detail given in them or according to that of the characters therein described They help us only to define and argue out fundamental principles We believe in the euality of all religions I derive the greatest consolation from my reading of Tulsidas's Ramayana I have also derived solace from the New Testament and the uran I don't approach them with a critical mind They are to me as important as the Bhagawad Gita though everything in the former may not appeal to me—everything in the Epistles of Paul for instance—nor everything in Tulsidas  Whilst I believe that the principal books are inspired they suffer from a process of double distillation Firstly they come through a human prophet and then through the commentaries of interpreters Nothing in them comes from God directly Mathew may give one version of one text and John may give another I cannot surrender my reason whilst I subscribe to divine revelation And above all ' the letter killeth the spirit giveth life '  In the purest type of Hinduism a brahmana an ant an elephant and a dog eater shwapacha are of the same status And because our philosophy is so high and we have failed to live up to it that very philosophy today stinks in our nostrils Hinduism insists on the brotherhood not only of all mankind but of all that lives It is a conception which makes one giddy but we have to work up to it The moment we have restored real living euality between man and man we shall be able to establish euality between man and the whole creation When that day comes we shall have peace on earth and goodwill to men

  2. says:

    I thought this was pretty mind shifting overall I thought I knew uite a lot about Ghandi but this swayed my thinking a little bit Ghandi essentially explains what his understanding is of Hinduism and how that translates into an actual way of life I guess his key philosophy is that you should live for the service of others What I have always found very hard to understand and maybe Ghandi had his hands tied but arguably one of the greatest acolytes of mankind and devotees to the service of the others was present in a country that had one of the largest humanitarian disasters when train loads of Hindus and Muslims and Sikhs crossed the borders between newly formed India and Pakistan in around 1947 One of the greatest proponents of mankind could not stop one of the largest killings of mankind Almost oxymoronish that statement right? My oldest friend is Hindu and I thought that I understood his religion but this book gave me some excellent insights into the religion and I have to admit that my respect for the it has gone up a great deal Here are some of the best bits from the book and some of his uotes• “I believe that the bible the uran and the Zend Avesta to be as much divinely inspired as the Vedas” Ghandi• Hinduism is a religion which doesn’t try to proselytise like Christianity would have done or Islam One of its key tenets is that it allows you to worship your own God according to your own rules and in that way in essence it is able to live with other religions It has been able to successfully absorb many tribes into its fold as a result • “There is no religion other than truth Truth is Rama Narayana Ishwara Khuda Allah and God” • “Knowledge is limitless and so is the application of truth”• “Our sages taught us to learn one thing As with the self so with the universe” – love this and really agree with this When the death of a leaf hits you you know you are getting to the realisation of this truth • Ghandi talks of his ultracrepidarian story about an artist who painted an amazing picture and encouraged individuals to come in and critiue it by marking the spots that they didn’t like Eventually over time the entire painting was painted with marks and yet it was a beautiful painting nevertheless as a whole You cannot please everyone • Another very important part of Ghandi’s philosophy and one that is extremely relevant in today’s keeping up with the Jones’s type world we live in was the simple tenet of not coveting your neighbour’s possessions• “Satisfaction lies in the effort not in the attainment Full effort is full victory” – love this uote

  3. says:

    As an atheist I felt the the book confirms certain thoughts I had on religion on the attitudes of Gandhi towards hindu scriptures and religion That there has to be a great deal of cherry picking to clean what is actually written in holy scriptures That good people interpret in positive ways the vague ideas that are interpreted in negative ways by other That smart religious people are aware that their belief is not sustained by logic but by their own will to belive which is since as something positive All this was interesting to see from what Gandhi writes here however the most value of this book for me was to hear the thoughts of a great man on how he lead his life It is inspiring to see the level of self determination love and compassion that ruled Gandhi's life His great tolerance for the rest His capacity to see good to seek it and to invite others to do good This book is food for the soul whatever that means

  4. says:

    Essential read especially for our turbulent times

  5. says:

    A book which gives clear apprehension of what religions are meant for and how people have perceived them

  6. says:

    Fantastic book a nice little read that opens up minds to different aspects of Hinduism through the eyes of Gandhiji

  7. says:

    This is no formal or structured introduction to Hinduism These are just snippets of the 'great soul's' interpretations of various aspects of Hinduism spiritual philosophical and many a times political through his writings speeches and letters Apart from his deep veneration of the all assimilating philosophical aspect of Hinduism that strives for a search of the ultimate truth amongst its many contradictory dogmas one of the recurring theme of those writings is his relentless attack on the practice of 'untouchability' a curse of Hinduism prevalent very much in pre independent India Can Mahatma be called a reformist as well? Humility sparkles from the writings of Gandhi Never claiming to be a scholar or authority on Hinduism he says Nor do I consider myself fit to interpret Hinduism except through my own life he provides the nuances of the religion and its practice as a way of life in a simple and easy to understand language Some of his writings could borderline 'Hindu Nationalism' yet his attitude remains secular and humane throughout Mahatma is a course in himself I remember his famous response when asked to give a message to the world my life is my messageRead this book to understand the man and his thoughts around religion Get another book if your sole objective is to learn about Hinduism

  8. says:

    What is Gandhi's Hinduism? It is the good fortune or the misfortune of Hinduism that it has no official creed In order therefore to protect myself against any misunderstanding I have said Truth and Non violence is my creed If I were asked to define the Hindu creed I should simply say search after Truth through non violent means A man may not believe even in God and still he may call himself a Hindu Hinduism is a relentless pursuit after truth and if today it has become moribund inactive irresponsive to growth it is because we are fatigued; and as soon as the fatigue is over Hinduism will burst forth upon the world with a brilliance perhaps unknown before Of course therefore Hinduism is the most tolerant of all religions Its creed is all embracing Often rambling and incoherent laced with wise phrases or paragraphs most of the useful stuff is actually unrelated to Hinduism itself This was probably the wrong book to start with in an effort to learn about Hinduism as there is a large array of vocabulary and stories that one should know before approaching

  9. says:

    I felt the book was a little difficult to grasp as the vocabulary was too tough for me and also many Sanskrit words were present for which the meaning wasn't provided Gandhiji's stand on untouchability can be understood and his knowledge on Gita and Vedas are reflected in the book

  10. says:

    Intriguing and Insightful

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