Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by

Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved [PDF / EPUB] Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved The contentious history of the idea of the black hole the most fascinating and bizarre celestial object in the heavens For than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute ove How an PDF/EPUB Ã The contentious history of the idea of the black hole the most fascinating and bizarre celestial object in the heavens For than half a century, physicists and Black Hole: PDF/EPUB ² astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe The weirdly alien notion of a space time abyss from which nothing escapes not Hole: How an PDF/EPUB è even light seemed to confound all logic This engrossing book tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein and Hawking and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the universe Renowned science writer Marcia Bartusiak shows how the black hole helped revive Einstein s greatest achievement, the general theory of relativity, after decades during which it had been pushed into the shadows Not until astronomers discovered such surprising new phenomena as neutron stars and black holes did the once sedate universe transform into an Einsteinian cosmos, filled with sources of titanic energy that can be understood only in the light of relativity This book celebrates the hundredth anniversary of general relativity, uncovers how the black hole really got its name, and recounts the scientists frustrating, exhilarating, and at times humorous battles over the acceptance of one of history s most dazzling ideas.


10 thoughts on “Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved

  1. says:

    Marcia Bartusiak has an impressive track record for writing about the development of astronomical ideas This time, for the centenary of the general theory of relativity she covers the history of black holes, from Isaac Newton up to date, and all in just over 200 pages She introduces the topic step by step, the way astronomers discovered it, from white dwarf stars and neutron stars to black holes themselves, via supernovae and pulsars With no equations, this is an easy read that provides insig Marcia Bartusiak has an impressive track record for writing about the development of astronomical ideas This time, for the centenary of the general theory of relativity she covers the history of black holes, from Isaac Newton up to date, and all in just over 200 pages She introduces the topic step by step, the way astronomers discovered it, from white dwarf stars and neutron stars to black holes themselves, via supernovae and pulsars With no equations, this is an easy read that provides insight into the way that scientists work and think, as well as into the mysterious subject matter of the title And I was surprised to find out who really was the first person to use the term in an astronomical context


  2. says:

    Decent, but somewhat lifeless Good for tracing the history of a single concept.


  3. says:

    This was a nice, light overview of the discovery of black holes There are, however, gaping holes in the commentary the author provides, like when an Indian scientist comes up with a solid theory and his white colleague humiliates him in public, driving him away from the topic for decades the tone is very ha ha quirky scientists instead of wow, there is some racism happening here The narrative is full of sexist metaphors and the author seems to find it funny that Kip Thorne and Stephen H This was a nice, light overview of the discovery of black holes There are, however, gaping holes in the commentary the author provides, like when an Indian scientist comes up with a solid theory and his white colleague humiliates him in public, driving him away from the topic for decades the tone is very ha ha quirky scientists instead of wow, there is some racism happening here The narrative is full of sexist metaphors and the author seems to find it funny that Kip Thorne and Stephen Hawking bet racy magazines over the existence of black holes instead of pointing out it s kind of crass for men to offer objectified women as a prize for scientific discoveries She was all and Thorne s wife was super bummed when Thorne won that Penthouse subscription So this is definitely a book that is meant to impart ONLY the surface history of how black holes came to be discovered, and leaves out the social implications of the roadblocks it might have faced due to systemic racism, sexism, etc It gave me the info without getting too heavy into the math science parts, and when it did delve into them, managed to explain them well enough that I got the concepts But wow, the way she framed the treatment of Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar is A P P A L L I N G White privilege at work, holy moly


  4. says:

    Interesting read on the history of the black hole The book focuses mainly on the scientists involved with discovering, explaining, and proving the existence of black holes I enjoyed learning how many different people actually contributed to the story over time, with many scientists building off the ones that came before them.


  5. says:

    Boring It s only science history about black holes only You must not read it, it s a wasted time to read it.


  6. says:

    This is a very well written account of the development of black hole physics It is written for the general audience, and no mathematical formulae are involved It s main focus is on the history of this branch of physicsthan on the actual physics itself I enjoyed reading it, and I recommend it to anyone wanting an initiation into this subject.


  7. says:

    This is quite a comprehensive account of the history of the concept of a black hole It covers a lot of ground and tries to be both succinct and precise But these are characteristics of much larger textbooks, and, as a whole, the books reads as a bland volume from a specialized series in History of Science The chapter s headings are at timesexciting I ll show these bastards than the actual content.There are, however, some interesting sections like the revealing story of quasars, and a This is quite a comprehensive account of the history of the concept of a black hole It covers a lot of ground and tries to be both succinct and precise But these are characteristics of much larger textbooks, and, as a whole, the books reads as a bland volume from a specialized series in History of Science The chapter s headings are at timesexciting I ll show these bastards than the actual content.There are, however, some interesting sections like the revealing story of quasars, and a brief but entertaining discussion about Roy Kerr s contribution For some reason, S Hawking feels a lot less lively than his legendary persona, and his famous bet of sexy magazines over the theory of black holes gets such sterile rendition it made me want to watch again the movie version of it I ve noticed that the international bestselling book of Leonard Susskind, THE BLACK HOLE WAR, is not even mentioned in the bibliography Omission of a well known laymen s book on the subject I bought my copy in Dubai raises doubts about the objectivity of the overall selection of material and its intended public whatever the author may think about it, this isn t a book heavy on research and destined for the specialist or advanced student In the same way that THE BLACK HOLE WAR was too passionate and biased, this book is such a dispassionate account, so correct in the not so good way we now use the term, and so devoid of any demanding concepts on Physics that, over time, I will have trouble remembering that I ve read it


  8. says:

    A little dry and straightforward nearly to a fault, but excellent at not only explaining areas of physics which can be impenetrable to non physicists like me but also at capturing the politics, personalities and predilections of specific periods in history during the evolution of thinking about black holes Enjoyed having completed the journey on this one a littlethan making that same journey.


  9. says:

    This is essentially pop science trash I felt generally condescended to for most of it, I don t think most people would feel they understand black holes better as a result of reading this book, and it was full of the same sort of scientist hero worship nonsense that I hate.That said, I find astronomy and cosmology boring as a general topic, so maybe if that s your thing you might find itentertaining.


  10. says:

    This story, presented by Marcia Bartusiak, is about the history of an idea, the concept of a black hole made possible, theoretically, by Albert Einstein s general theory of relativity For those interested in black holes and their reluctant acknowledgement that they existed, given in the late twentieth century, this is a must read story It took that long to verify their existence because regular optical telescopes could not see them Radio and or X ray telescopes were needed to pinpoint the a This story, presented by Marcia Bartusiak, is about the history of an idea, the concept of a black hole made possible, theoretically, by Albert Einstein s general theory of relativity For those interested in black holes and their reluctant acknowledgement that they existed, given in the late twentieth century, this is a must read story It took that long to verify their existence because regular optical telescopes could not see them Radio and or X ray telescopes were needed to pinpoint the attendant energy associated with matter hungry black holes Black hole research reinvigorated interest in Einstein s general theory of relativity After the flurry of excitement in 1919, Bartusiak writes, when a famous solar eclipse measurement triumphantly provided the proof for Einstein s general theory of relativity, the noted physicist s new outlook on gravity came to be largely ignored Isaac Newton s take on gravity worked just fine in our everyday world of low velocities and normal stars, so why be concerned with the miniscule adjustments that general relativity offered General relativity had no practical use and, in 1955, when Einstein died, general relativity was in the doldrums Roy Kerr, a mathematical physicist advanced the study of black holes by finding a way to refashion Einstein s equations to handle the rotation of a star The rotating object in his solution was dragging space time around with it, says Bartusiak, like the cake batter that circulates in the bowl around a whirling beater Then Stephen Hawking, of A Brief History of Time fame, decided to look at the black hole from the perspective of an atom His mathematical approach led to the discovery that all black holes spinning or not would be radiating energy Hawking announced his discovery in February 1974 Bartusiak adds, In applying the laws of quantum mechanics to a black hole, Hawking found that black holes create and emit particles as if they were hot bodies As a consequence, the black hole slowly decreases in mass and eventually disappears in a final blast Besides this startling breakthrough, it was found that the temperature of a black hole was not zero at all, although it is close to zero less than a millionth of a degree above absolute zero The temperature of the radiation leaving the black hole is now known as Hawking radiation And that s where we stand today, with physicists trying to unify the world of quantum mechanics using the perspective of the atom with that of general relativity leveraging the perspective of space time.And now that gravity waves, as Einstein had predicted, have been discovered and subsequent to the release of this book , theorists can re focus their energies to describe a theory consistent with this latest experimental result, with the hope of finally finding the theory of everything There is no doubt that black holes will be at the center of this unifying work


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