The Invisible Girls MOBI Ë The Invisible PDF \


The Invisible Girls [PDF / EPUB] The Invisible Girls Twenty seven year old Sarah Thebarge had it all a loving boyfriend, an Ivy League degree, and a successful career when her life was derailed by an unthinkable diagnosis aggressive breast cancer After Twenty seven year old Sarah Thebarge had it all a loving boyfriend, an Ivy League degree, and a successful career when her life was derailed by an unthinkable diagnosis aggressive breast cancer After surviving the grueling treatments though just barely Sarah moved to Portland, Oregon to start over There, a chance encounter with an exhausted African mother and her daughters transformed The Invisible PDF \ her life again A Somali refugee whose husband had left her, Hadhi was struggling to raise five young daughters, half a world a way from her war torn homeland Alone in a strange country, Hadhi and the girls were on the brink of starvation in their own home, invisible to their neighbors and to the world As Sarah helped Hadhi and the girls navigate American life, her outreach to the family became a source of courage and a lifeline for herself Poignant, at times shattering, Sarah Thebarge s riveting memoir invites readers to engage in her story of finding connection, love, and redemption in the most unexpected places.

    EPUB is an ebook file format Oregon to start over There, a chance encounter with an exhausted African mother and her daughters transformed The Invisible PDF \ her life again A Somali refugee whose husband had left her, Hadhi was struggling to raise five young daughters, half a world a way from her war torn homeland Alone in a strange country, Hadhi and the girls were on the brink of starvation in their own home, invisible to their neighbors and to the world As Sarah helped Hadhi and the girls navigate American life, her outreach to the family became a source of courage and a lifeline for herself Poignant, at times shattering, Sarah Thebarge s riveting memoir invites readers to engage in her story of finding connection, love, and redemption in the most unexpected places."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 272 pages
  • The Invisible Girls
  • Sarah Thebarge
  • English
  • 03 March 2019
  • 9781455523917

10 thoughts on “The Invisible Girls

  1. says:

    Very mixed feelings about this one but I think it s well worth the read This memoir was really three stories, two of them very absorbing and the thirdwell, for me, not so much Briefly, a young woman who was raised in a fundamentalist religious home, grows up to far surpass what was expected of a woman She earns two degrees, becomes a medical professional with plans also in journalism but develops breast cancer in her twenties This part of the story was chilling, heart breaking, inspiring as she battles through set back after medical setback, all the while enduring spiritual, emotional, and romantic disappointment Through the entire book, she struggles w her faith, and especially through her protracted battle w cancer, nearly giving up on God After her medical ordeal nearly two years , she relocates to Portland and meets, by chance, a refugee Somali family a mother w five little girls who are living in desperate poverty.Her taking this family under her wing and trying to help in every way she could, was fascinating In a very real sense, the family saved her as much as she saved them This part of the book was a sad revelation of the difficulties and hurtles many refugees face, even here.She continued to struggle w her beliefs, but at last found her way back to real faith This was as important to her as overcoming her illness, but the ending bothered methe indications were she was becoming intense enough in her re discovered faith, to begin proselytizing, beginning w a young prositute she meets on the street For someone of faith, this aspect of the book might be very inspiring, but I found her childhood church and the clergy in it to be misogynistic and narrow minded Since she is a generous and extremely giving person, I m hoping her brand of religion might differ from how she was brought up She continues to write and publish, mainly to publicize the plight of political refugees, and even raise enough money to send the little girls to college one day I guess that kind of faith, even I can believe in.

  2. says:

    I have no doubt that Thebarge means well However, this memoir is disjointed, self serving, and completely privilege blind It is half of the story a minute glimpse into the plight of a family of Somalian refugees wholly through the lens of a young, American cancer survivor We get zero time with the family outside of Thebarge s judgements of and interactions with them Without these pieces of the story, I have a very hard time believing this project was created to benefit this Somalian family Not to mention that enlisting local organizations would insure that the family gets long term assistance and resources from trained professionals Ultimately, Invisible Girls reads as a vanity project to salve the author s feelings of loss and displacement Will not recommend to anyone ever.

  3. says:

    This book was unlike anything I ve ever read before The Invisible Girls is the story of two women in recovery, one from breast cancer and the other from having to leave her country for an unfamiliar one They find solace in each other and their friendship is written in a style that s very difficult to describe simply put, you ll have to read it for yourself to see what I mean I ve read books with similar plots where the story quickly turns into death and depression and a pity party for the main character The Invisible Girls is totally different it s about renewal and trust and about paying it forward, about people taking care of each other, something that in these days of constant technology and text communication is starting to decline and , unfortunately.

  4. says:

    I wanted to like this book, I really did It was recommended to me by a dear friend who is also a writer, and the topic of immigrants and poverty and spiritual growth are close to my heart But I can t recommend it Either the writer is too young to be writing memoir or she is still too close to the events in the book to be able to provide much depth or perspective I think it s the former, because the tone is self absorbed and self congratulatory we are told about two dozen times that the little girls shriek and race to hug her each time she arrives at their apartment The spiritual journey is shallow and not well fleshed out, although it s supposed to be a major part of the book The structure is clunky and the time frame is hard to follow she s always moving back and forth in time with no markers I m afraid I don t have much good to say about it On to the next memoir on my list

  5. says:

    I was drawn in by the title of this book, and I must say I am still unclear who exactly Ms Thebarge means Is it her, because of her breast cancer diagnosis at an early age is it the family of Somalians she befriends or the little girls of that family that are invisible This was not an easy read because of all the disjointed ideas and fragmented thoughts While this is a her account of her experience with medical issues, I found it difficult to believe understand some of the claims I, too, am a breast cancer survivor, but I never once felt invisible becuase of it, and I never once felt less than compassion and caring and true concern from all levels of the medical profession with whom I had contact.The final point of this book was Ms Thebarge s concern about who was going to help the little girls go to college What a naive leap was made here These are children who didn t know what toilet paper was for, have beds they didn t know what silverware was, or even have chairs to sit in The mother still couldn t speak or understand English without her daughter translating by the end of the book And Ms Thebarge worries who will pay for college What about who will help them with their basic daily needs and socialization This may have been a blog jounal of interest, but it doesn t merit a book At least not a book where so many thoughts have been intertwined just to try to make a link between two separate and distinct stories I do applaud the author for stepping outside her comfort zone and befriending these people She just needs to crystallize her thoguhts and be clear on the development of a new life for her new friends.

  6. says:

    Absolutely seeped in self congratulation and condescension, with no small amount of Christian evangelizing There s probably a good story in here and a worthwhile cause, but well, the last line of the book is literally a child telling the author when I grow up, I want to be just like you FIN.

  7. says:

    I read this post from Sarah on a Saturday, ordered the book almost immediately and had it in hand early the next week Within 36 hours from the time I glanced at the first pages, I d read the entire thing I hardly ever do this some books take me months to read A number of things about this book intrigued me First is the interplay between the story of how a young woman grappled with a double mastectomy and her interaction with a Somali family lost in a culture they didn t understand Second, she reaches a hope filled conclusion as to where God is when the pain and loneliness are louder than any other sounds and people don t know what to say or do so they withdraw Finally, she calls attention to a population in the United States in need of serious consideration Immigrants who are treated as though they don t exist due to ethic, linguistic, and religious differences therefore, their lives here in the land of the free and the home of the brave are made even challenging Sarah helps us see this doesn t have to be and can be changed one family at a time.

  8. says:

    A memoir I seem to be reading memoirs these days than I have at any other point in my life Maybe it s because people are writing them Or because people are taking memoir seriously Or because I m taking memoir seriously now that I ve hit the wise, old age of 26 Probably, it partially has something to do with the rise of blogs and the coveted blog to book deal dream.I think this one was a blog to book deal At least, TheBarge mentions a blog I tried to find it, but all I found was a wiped template with a few pages advertising the book Now that a publisher is paying her for her story, the blog is dead.This makes me sad for blogs.Sarah TheBarge does have quite the story, and certainly a story that belong on paper, reaching people than her blog would have, perhaps At the age of 27, her life fell apart when she discovered blood on her shirt and, upon squeezing her breast, realize something was very very wrong A double mastectomy And then, it recurred Essentially, TheBarge lived through a nightmare A few years later, in a new city, trying to restart her life, she meets a Somalian woman and her children on a bus and a new part of her story begins as she gets to know the family and helps them survive in the new and unfamiliar country It was a touching story Emotional Difficult to read There were times I had to close the book on my commute home or face the embarrassment of crying on the subway But, this book is also problematic in two very different ways 1 Are you familiar with the White Saviour Complex Admittedly, I was warned before I started this book that its pages are filled with it, so perhaps it was all the glaring for me, this idea that Westerners, specifically white westerners, will save Africa, that, without us, they will be lost, suffering savages This complex is generally attached to the attitude of Westerners when they go to African countries, but I couldn t ignore its presence in this book as well TheBarge muses than once about what would have happened to Hadhi, the Somalian woman, and her children if she hadn t met them on the bus that day The problem with this Hadhi is not empowered by TheBarge s attitude Her work to care for her children, to eke out a life for them in this new place goes unacknowledged I would never say that we shouldn t acknowledge our privilege and recognize that we can help those who struggle here at home or in other countries I m not saying that TheBarge should have ignored this family on the bus I m not saying that she shouldn t have done all the things she did, bringing them gifts, helping them make ends meet But her attitude about what she was doing irked me Help, yes, but don t assume that you are the only thing protecting them from sure death and suffering.2 TheBarge grew up in a strict Baptist community The book is strongly Christian, which, being a Christian myself, I actually enjoyed She makes some beautiful realizations about God and suffering as she struggles with her illness and her relationships But, as she described her upbringing, her church, and the community in which she was raised, I became frustrated with what she wasn t saying She shrugged off the emotional abuse, in one breath using it for shock value and in another, dismissing the actions of others as normal, as not their fault, as justified and rationalized She holds the hurt of being abandoned by her church community and her boyfriend as she struggled through treatment at arms length, unwilling to acknowledge how absolutely shitty they were to her It bothered me Sometimes, I think people use religion as an excuse to be terrible to their kids, their spouses, those who are, in some way, under their control and no one ever holds them to their actions At the end of the book, I felt a little bit like TheBarge wasn t necessarily ready to write her story yet It felt raw at times see above, crying on the subway , but at others, she seemed to be holding the reader or her experience at arms length, laying out facts and actions without exploring them further, without letting the reader into the deep, gut wrenching pain she must have gone through Her journey was powerful, but in this book, I don t think she allowed it be.http www.thisdustyhouse.com 2013 05

  9. says:

    This is really three books in one There is the story of how Sarah meets a Somali refugee family on a train and immediately feels a connection with them, and so befriends the mother and her five girls and becomes a part of her life Then there is the flashback story to when, at 27, Sarah was diagnosed with breast cancer This is told with very honest emotion and feelings not just the shock and physical pain, but also how it seemed that her friends, and fiancee, all seemed to distance themselves from her at a time when she needed them most.Lastly is Sarah s story of faith I am not a religious person, so this part was hard for me to relate to, and tbh, by the end of the book she had become a little too evangelical for me However, I appreciate her devotion and her ability to keep her faith through very difficult times Particularly considering the fundamental upbringing she had.And so the invisible girls are the refugee family who are brought to America with no skills, money, or language to be able to live effectively It is also Sarah who became invisible to everyone through her illness And it is also the girls Sarah grew up with in a fundamental christian upbringing who were seen as a means to procreate and have no further value outside of being a mother.It is a memoir, so we are obviously getting one viewpoint, but it did make me wonder about what support networks are available in the US for refugees It seemed that without Sarah s support the family would have starved and or frozen at some points There is also the slight cringe factor that she would buy them pizzas, and soap and toilet paper and never really explained why she didn t go to a refugee or migrant center to get the family some help I can only assume they exist there But Sarah was rather broken from her experiences and needed the family perhaps than they needed her.An interesting novel, for which the proceeds are being used to send these 5 Somali girls to college How fascinating it would be to read their stories in the years to come.

  10. says:

    Sarah Thebarge s The Invisible Girls A Memoir is a testament to endurance, hope, and selflessness Sarah grew up a pastor s child in a conservative Christian family As a young adult, her future seemed bright A bright student, she earned a pair of Ivy League degrees in journalism and medicine Mr Right seemed close to proposing That is until cancer derailed the trajectory of her life and she found herself on the brink of death After narrowly surviving, she fled her life and found herself in Portland, OR, as far away as she could get It was there she chanced upon a family of Somali refugee girls on the commuter train Sarah took a chance and befriended the family As their improbably friendship developed, Sarah discovered their commonality She too was a refugee from her own life She too was oppressed the religious fundamentalism of her tribe, particularly regarding the suffocating roles assigned to women God was a harsh patriarch who treated her in ways she could not treat her worst enemy Through the process of losing her life to help this struggling family, she recovers her faith and a God worth worshipping.Sarah writes in a nimble and understated style Her characters like Vonnegut s Potato chip thin and irresistible You cannot stop at one, two, or twelve She recounts each set back, trial, and betrayal with journalistic objectivity, leaving room for the reader to mourn and get angry for her Her deceptions of despair and hope are equally believable, making her one of the promising voices in the genre of spiritual memoir I suspect that she, along with Mike Stavlund, are among the brightest in the next generation of spiritual memoirist that will push the genre forward with as much force as Donald Miller and Anne Lamott did a decade ago This is not to say Sarah s voice is derivative of either of these giants Her voice was uniquely forged on the anvil of her suffering, her wisdom was hard won I look forward to reading of Thebarge s work She has a voice that deserves to be heard for years to come.

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