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Picasso [PDF / EPUB] Picasso Huffington stips bare the romantic myths to reveal, in all its volatile complexity, Picasso s lifelong struggle between his power to create and his compulsion to destroy Huffington stips bare the romantic myths to reveal, in all its volatile complexity, Picasso s lifelong struggle between his power to create and his compulsion to destroy.


10 thoughts on “Picasso

  1. says:

    In a biography I am looking for an impartial presentation I neither like hagiographies or those biographies that negatively skew facts The author of this book chooses to present a preponderance of negative over positive assertions concerning the artist, his life and his art By book s end, given such a negative presentation, I no longer trusted anything I was told Much reads as gossip Often we are told opinions of those involved in disputes Tell me, how impartial can these views be I by no In a biography I am looking for an impartial presentation I neither like hagiographies or those biographies that negatively skew facts The author of this book chooses to present a preponderance of negative over positive assertions concerning the artist, his life and his art By book s end, given such a negative presentation, I no longer trusted anything I was told Much reads as gossip Often we are told opinions of those involved in disputes Tell me, how impartial can these views be I by no means am stating that Picasso was an angel He was arrogant, cruel and self centered Humility was a concept foreign to the man s character Sex was paramount, both in his life and in his art When he grew old and couldn t perform sexually and as physical infirmities mounted, one can easily imagine the effect this had on him When he died at the age of 91 he was not thinking clearly, but who does I feel that a biographer must take such into consideration if a balanced analysis of the subject s personality is to be achieved Picasso s personality and his family circumstances are covered but not in a balanced manner Picasso was an innovative painter, sculptor, ceramicist, printmaker, poet and playwright He was always doing something new He never stood still in his practice of art In trying new art forms he looked at and listened to others, then broke all the rules What he did, he did in his own way, and what he did worked He expressed in his art an essence that few others could achieve The book moves forward chronologically and all his different art forms are covered We follow his paintings from the Blue Period to experiments with primitive art to different types of cubism to the Green Period to Dadaism to Surrealism and sexualism in art And of course Guernica, not an art form but a monument of art expression Along the way we follow his family, his lovers, his acquaintances and his communist ties When I look at art I don t want it explained, and certainly not by one who dislikes the art and who dislikes the person who made it If the artwork doesn t speak to you, then so be it I feel strongly that art should be separated from the actions of those who create it I can strongly dislike the behavior of an artist and yet still appreciate that person s art I believe Huffington intertwines the two.What I did like in this book is the author s presentation of the other artists that Picasso rubbed shoulders with in Montparnasse and Montmartre at the turn of the 20th century, Paris of the Belle poque era I personally was interested in what we are told about Gertrude Stein, Henri Matisse, Georges Braque, Henri Rousseau, Alberto Giacometti, Guillaume Apollinaire, Marc Chagall, Jean Cocteau, and Sergei Diaghilev Interesting tidbits and lots about how each of them interacted with the others I did point out that there is a lot of gossip to be found within the pages of this book The nastiest portions focus on how the mistresses, wives, children and servants viewed one another Such gossip doesn t lead to a better understanding of relationships People were devoted to Picasso As he is drawn here, this is incredibly hard to believe I see this as a major fault of the book Picasso said, It is not what an artist does that counts, but what he is Surely this will give food for thought in observing Picasso s own life Picasso was a seismograph of his age He lived from 1881 1973 He was tormented and filled with rage He challenged and he shocked One perhaps can rightly ask if in his art one senses heart Maybe in some, but in others that is quite simply not the message Picasso is trying to convey We are told that Huffington has interviewed several who knew Picasso and has researched documentation that already exists The book is studded with quotes, but some of them are from unspecified sources She has spoken to Fran oise Gilot, one of his numerous mistresses and the mother of two of his four children She has in fact written her own biography on Picasso Life with Picasso Personally, I would recommend reading that rather than getting the second hand references as they are presented here The audiobook is narrated by Wanda McCaddon She reflects through her intonation the feelings the author expresses in her lines I think a narrator should help the reader understand what an author is saying, so I have no complaint about this I must point out that to listen to the audiobook I was forced to slow down the narration speed to 75% Only at this speed did it flow naturally Only at this speed did it sound as people really do talk At other speeds you will detect a distortion


  2. says:

    I had read my first book on Picasso already when I was a teenager and it was the well known Life with Picasso by Fran oise Gilot I could not understand back then why actually Picasso got married to that Russian ballerina Olga Koklova Now I know it thanks to this very thorough and systematic biography by Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington I did not know as well that one of Picasso s numerous names was Juan Nepomuceno after his godfather I was surprised to know how very sociable he was I ha I had read my first book on Picasso already when I was a teenager and it was the well known Life with Picasso by Fran oise Gilot I could not understand back then why actually Picasso got married to that Russian ballerina Olga Koklova Now I know it thanks to this very thorough and systematic biography by Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington I did not know as well that one of Picasso s numerous names was Juan Nepomuceno after his godfather I was surprised to know how very sociable he was I have no true friends I have only lovers, Picasso would say Jean Jacques Rousseau confessed somewhere that he used to be in love with every woman he met as well How different he seemed to be however from Picasso whose bisexual relationships were full of violent rage and even sadism It was the language of power which Picasso understood and spoke fluently In my opinion, the twentieth century was peopled with such Nietzschean Supermen Most interesting for me was reading about Picasso s struggle not getting older How he pretended he was untouched by age How he began to suffer from people s presence Moreover, as his health took a turn for the worse, there appeared futility, disgust, nightmares, and paranoia.I liked the author s Epilogue very much too I can only agree that Picasso brought to painting the vision of disintegration that Schoenberg and Bartok brought to music, Kafka and Beckett to literature


  3. says:

    Not bad Picasso is certainly a muchintriguing character than Arianna Huffington s writing style It was a good read once I got over her style and to me odd sentence structure coming out of left field every once in a while.Good overview of Picasso s life that makes me want to explore his life a bitI m eying Francoise Gilot s Life with Picasso because it purportedly sheds muchlight on his work methods and approaches to his work, and as an artist herself as well as one of hi Not bad Picasso is certainly a muchintriguing character than Arianna Huffington s writing style It was a good read once I got over her style and to me odd sentence structure coming out of left field every once in a while.Good overview of Picasso s life that makes me want to explore his life a bitI m eying Francoise Gilot s Life with Picasso because it purportedly sheds muchlight on his work methods and approaches to his work, and as an artist herself as well as one of his wives, it has a lot to offer The book is well documented and apparently A.R had access to a number of people in Picasso s life that had not given interviews before Without having read any other books about Picasso s life, I d hazard an opinion that this one does a pretty good job


  4. says:

    Harkening back to an earlier book I read The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson, I believe they would have to invent a whole new test for Pablo Picasso because he would be off the charts However, the Modern Lovers ode to the artist is accurate in that nobody ever called Pablo Picasso an asshole at least not while he was alive So great was his ability to manipulate his sychophants that he became a worldwide symbol of Peace and humanity In private, he makes Salvador Dali and Gala look like Th Harkening back to an earlier book I read The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson, I believe they would have to invent a whole new test for Pablo Picasso because he would be off the charts However, the Modern Lovers ode to the artist is accurate in that nobody ever called Pablo Picasso an asshole at least not while he was alive So great was his ability to manipulate his sychophants that he became a worldwide symbol of Peace and humanity In private, he makes Salvador Dali and Gala look like The Waltons and they were also egomaniacs who were seriously lacking in empathy Only one of his long term partners, Francoise an artist in her own right and mother of Picasso s children Claude and Paloma managed to escape without becoming a deranged, dependent she later married Dr Jonas Salk It is her story which is the source of many of the gory details While Picasso did have the ability to charm, this book makes it clear that he did so only to lure people into some sort of humiliating trap.Having seen a fair number of Picasso s paintings I can say that some madeof an impression than others However, knowing the context in which they were created, would make them a lotinteresting to me were I to revisit them Arianna Huffington is not an art historian, which was one of the main criticisms leveled at this biography However, it is not meant as art history as much as straight biography Anyone looking to immerse themselves in early 20th century Caf Society as well as those who cannot resist looking at a train wreck will not be able to put this book down


  5. says:

    Quite fascinating Some people have been critical because it is so negative on him and his relationships on women, but based on the evidence I don t think much of the criticisms are too far off Particularly interesting is his relationship with Francoise Gilot, the one woman he wounded but didn t destroy She paid a heavy price for her rebellion against him, however.


  6. says:

    My first thought when I finished this book was, Wow Before I read this book, I thought of Picasso as an incredible artist but a pig of a man because of the way he had treated the women in his life, as well as his children After reading this book, that impression was not dispelled I m not entirely sure the wow was because of what he did to the women in his life or because he ended up a victim of his own game, in the guise of Jacqueline, at the end of his life The book itself is very infor My first thought when I finished this book was, Wow Before I read this book, I thought of Picasso as an incredible artist but a pig of a man because of the way he had treated the women in his life, as well as his children After reading this book, that impression was not dispelled I m not entirely sure the wow was because of what he did to the women in his life or because he ended up a victim of his own game, in the guise of Jacqueline, at the end of his life The book itself is very information dense, particularly in the beginning when Picasso leaves Spain for Paris It would seem Picasso was always up to something, whether it was a new way of painting, a new woman or new people to adore him It would also seem that Picasso never learned the lesson of what you seek, if you don t find it within you, you will never find it without He was always seeking that ultimate painting, that one woman or that one friend who would completely fulfill him and always failing Just when he was on the verge of finding fulfillment, he set about destroying it The man left, not a trail, but an interstate s worth of people behind him that he had crushed, humiliated or completely destroyed throughout his life The one woman who survived living with Picasso reasonably intact did so because she refused to completely give in to him She always found some way toor less keep her center, despite his abuse The other women in his life ended up broken in many ways and the stronger they seemed to be when they met Picasso, the worse they fell Dora Maar seemed to get the worse of it, ending up in an asylum for a time His children didn t seem to fare much better, considering their father lost interest in them and eventually abandoned them This was not an easy book for me to read, yet at the same time it was as if I was witnessing a lifelong trainwreck I couldn t look away Toward the end, it should have been easy to feel as if Picasso had gotten what he deserved in the form of Jacqueline, who proceeded to completely isolate him from the world She also forced him to depend on her for almost everything outside of painting by playing on his fears and paranoia Instead, I was left shaking my head at all the damage this one man did to so many of those around him, even after his death All because they dared to love him Wow, indeed


  7. says:

    I do not understand why this book has such harsh criticism I found it to be captivating People say that the author has an agenda and is trying to make Picasso look bad, but I found her tone to be very neutral in the sens that she only uses what the people around him said about him She takes nothing away from his genius, his creativity and importance in the developpement of modern art She shows him for what he really was a flawed, imperfect human being and if you do not like to see a crestfa I do not understand why this book has such harsh criticism I found it to be captivating People say that the author has an agenda and is trying to make Picasso look bad, but I found her tone to be very neutral in the sens that she only uses what the people around him said about him She takes nothing away from his genius, his creativity and importance in the developpement of modern art She shows him for what he really was a flawed, imperfect human being and if you do not like to see a crestfallen hero, then maybe this book isn t quite for you This book really helps to further understand the art of an artist who helped shape this world As for the criticism about her style of writing I thought it to be very insightful and intestesting, but then again I read it in french so maybe the translation isn t the same


  8. says:

    Wow This was actually kind of depressing, Picasso was just so awful in so many ways And yet how fascinating to have been able to meet him for yourself, obviously he had a tremendous ability to keep everyone in his thrall, so there must have been something there aside from his artistic talent Maybe I just can t imagine fighting another woman for a man, like his poor ladies warred with each otherespecially when he deliberately set it up for his own amusementhey honey, you win, you can ha Wow This was actually kind of depressing, Picasso was just so awful in so many ways And yet how fascinating to have been able to meet him for yourself, obviously he had a tremendous ability to keep everyone in his thrall, so there must have been something there aside from his artistic talent Maybe I just can t imagine fighting another woman for a man, like his poor ladies warred with each otherespecially when he deliberately set it up for his own amusementhey honey, you win, you can have the SOB and good luck to you But whatever one s final thoughts on Pablo, his story does make for engrossing reading


  9. says:

    As a lover of art, I was fascinated by Picasso s life, that is, until I read it and realized he was a profound monster who hated women as well as any other artist who dared cross his path Unforunately, I ll never look at his work again without it being overshadowed by his attempt to destroy the lives of every person he came in contact Particularly horrific was how he allowed one of his best friends to die in a concentration camp rather than sign a letter to free him.


  10. says:

    I really enjoyed this as a first book to read about Picasso I m reading a couple others right now, Life With Picasso by Francoise Gilot and Matisse and Picasso their Rivalry and Friendship by Flan, and I always know when things are happening and who the other characters are, while going intodepth This is a great survey book, taking you through his life with all of its scenes and actors, and Ms Huffington s opinions are colorful and arguably insightful.


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